Wildflowers of WA: A key to biodiversity

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WA is world famous for its wildflowers. Every spring, an abundance of colour spreads across the state from north to south between June and November. There are more than 12,000 species of wildflowers in WA, making it the world’s largest collection. As many of them can not be found anywhere else in the world, WA’s wildflowers have a huge ecological significance.1.

The South West of WA in particular is of enormous importance to sustain biodiversity and provide a native environment where unique fauna and flora can flourish. It is one of the world's richest flora areas, but many of the species are under serious threat. As such the area is recognised as a biodiversity hotspot.

75% of the plants discovered here so far are endemic. The South West is also home to many different animals, birds and fungi species, many of which are also unique to this part of the world.2

 

 

FOR 130 MILLION YEARS, WILDFLOWERS HAVE BLESSED THE EARTH WITH THEIR AMAZING SKILL SETS AND STUNNING BEAUTY – ABSOLUTELY FREE OF CHARGE! 

Amongst the more than 8,000 species of wildflowers, you can find carpets of everlastings, orange wild pomegranate, bright pink native foxgloves, grevillea, acacia, purple darwinia and dampiera, thriptomene, smokebush, woody pear, cassias, eremophila, blue cornflower and yellow bells, the unique wreath flower and many species of orchids3 – to name only a few.

Supporting ecosystems

Whilst the wildflowers with their abundance of colour provide excellent photo opportunities and attract thousands of visitors each year, they are also doing a lot of practical work. They are essential components in sustaining native environments, where wildlife and pollinators can flourish and attract even more species. They have an important role in providing compost and in creating self-regulating water filtration systems. They also form part of a continent-wide erosion control program.

Wildflowers form an essential part in the larger chain

Providing healthy habitats that encourage native environments to thrive. Helping to create these healthy and sustainable ecosystems is at the core of Carbon Neutral Charitable Fund’s philosophy. By planting a wide variety of local native tree species, rather than choosing monocultures, the native landscapes are restored and biodiversity can be revived. As a result, an even wider variety of native flowers and animals will find their way back into the once degenerated areas. By choosing to reduce your carbon footprint with Carbon Neutral Charitable Fund, you can play your part in restoring biodiversity for future generations.

  1. http://www.westernaustralia.com/en/THINGS_TO_SEE_AND_DO/FOREST_AND_FLOWERS/WAWILDFLOWERS/Pages/WAWildflowers.aspx
  2. https://www.wheatbeltnrm.org.au/news/xbvsdgsdg
  3. http://www.wildflowercountry.com.au